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00:24:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. This interview took place at the Exploratorium on October 10, 2013, just prior to her performance of Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief.

00:50:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. Here she performs Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief, as part of the Exploratorium’s Resonance series.

00:07:10
Seasonal cycles and winter storms bring extra-high "king tides" that can swamp coastal structures and habitats. What’s a coastal dweller to do? Take pictures! It’s no joke: Educators from the California King Tides Initiative explain how citizen snapshots can be of real value to researchers and policy makers.

00:30:00
Tardigrades are amazing creatures that can withstand the most extreme conditions on Earth, as well as the vacuum of space! This unique and charismatic animal has the ability to survive in a variety of situations. In today's program, Exploratorium scientist Karen Kalumuck will continue our programming about life in extreme environments as it relates to the search for 'habitability' on Mars.

00:03:15
Join Dr. Russell Schnell, the director of the Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as he talks about what it takes to monitor climate change.

00:03:16
Dr. John Barnes, Station Manager of NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory, shares the history of Charles Keeling's pioneering carbon dioxide measurements, which have been taken continually at Mauna Loa since 1958.

00:20:39
On March 1st, we connected live with scientists aboard the scientific drilling vessel the JOIDES Resolution off the coast of Antarctica. Meet geologists Rob Dunbar, Carlota Escutia, and Christina Riesselman and learn about their historic expedition to Antarctica that is helping reveal the history of Earth's climate and teaching us about our climate future.

00:03:15
This short video summarizes all of the steps in collecting an ice core using the Deep Ice Sheet Coring (DISC) drill. Thomas Bauska, of Oregon State University helped Heidi Roop put together this video.

00:36:28
As a special event in conjunction with the 2009 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, we connected a live audience at the Exploratorium with scientists at the South Pole. Learn about atmospheric research at the South Pole from NOAA's Nick Morgan, the IceCube neutrino detector from Mark Krasberg and Laura Gladstone, and the South Pole Telescope from Bill Holzapfel.

00:05:15
Geologist Chistina Riesselman explains how studying 3-million-year-old sediment from Antarctica is providing a glimpse of what our planet's climate might look like if atmospheric carbon dioxide continues to rise as projected.