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00:03:30
Justin Holl and Peter Winch from the Gulf of the Farallones Marine Sanctuary and print-maker Julie Whitcomb explore squid anatomy through dissections, ink extractions, and squid prints.

00:00:45
An introduction to a spinning disc called a stroboscope, which lets you create your own animated cartoon.

00:04:32
A detailed demonstration of how to make a stroboscope, including a discussion of materials needed.

00:00:47
The science behind the Whirling Watcher stroboscope, including a discussion of the phenomenon called persistence of vision, which in this activity creates the illusion of a galloping horse.

00:07:58
How does your eye work? You see the world because light gets into your eyes. Your eye uses that light to make an image of the world inside your eye—just as a camera uses light to make a photograph. At the Exploratorium, we dissect cow eyes to show people how an eye functions, and look at the parts that make up an eye. This video shows and explains a dissection with one of our staff Explainers.

00:10:19
Join the Exploratorium's Dr. Paul Doherty as he visits a "sculpture to observe the stars" in northern New Mexico, where the Sangre de Cristo Mountains meet the eastern plains. There artist Charles Ross is creating an art installation that is also a star observatory. This major earthwork has two main elements: the Star Tunnel, which allows you to walk through the entire history of the earth's changing alignment to our North Star, Polaris; and the Solar Pyramid, where one can visually experience an hour of the earth's rotation.

00:09:54
Our team of middle school students from the Aim High program investigates new technologies that use our unique physical traits as tools for identification. Eye-D explores the possibilities of retinal scans.

1:12:03
In a broad-ranging look at the impact of Eames design on contemporary culture, Steve Cabella hosts a discussion with Joseph Rosa, Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

1:04:44
Join us for an interactive webcast that includes a visit to Museo La Specola in Florence, Italy. The museum houses a collection of exquisite life-sized wax medical models that in the late 18th century represented the cutting edge of 3-dimensional imaging technology. We'll also talk with Dr. Hugh Patterson, Chief Anatomy Professor at UCSF, about how today's medical students study anatomy, and with John Murray of 3-D Systems, about the latest developments in solid object imaging.