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00:06:10
Get to know the grandfather of all instruments, the Pipe Organ. We talked with Schoenstein & Company Organ Builders about the process of designing, constructing, and fine-tuning their instruments.

00:04:58
Throughout history, tattoos have represented conquests, coming of age, religion, spirituality, art, and even punishment. Today, tattoos are alive and thriving as a form of personal expression. How have modern techniques changed this art form? What are best practices in tattoo creation and care? Why are tattoos permanent—and when are they not? Join us as we "talk tat" with artitsts Suzanne "Fishy" Shifflett and Tanya Wischerath of Modern Electric Tattoo in San Francisco.

00:02:48
Amy Williams, chair of Fashion at San Francisco's California College of Arts encourages the creative spirit of her students through creation of opulent gowns, made in a day with just pattern makers tissue and tape. The result is not only an education for students, but also a playful and performative experience in the process of fashion creation.

00:04:16
Dr. Marvin Speece, professor of geophysical engineering at Montana Tech and co-Principal Investigator of the Offshore New Harbor Project, discusses how their expedition collects scientific data.

00:43:30
Julia Child and physicist Philip Morrison once cooked up (and sampled) "primordial soup," a mixture of ingredients said to be the materials from which life sprang on Earth. How accurate is this notion? David Deamer studies how some molecules self-assemble into order, and has developed new theories about how life evolved from components on Earth. We’ll talk with him, do hands-on experiments, and watch vintage footage of Julia Child tasting the soup. Guests: David Deamer, Director, UC Berkeley SETI Program, and Karen Kalumuk, Exploratorium staff scientist.

00:25:57
Dr. Walter Gilbert, a physicist who turned to molecular biology in 1960, won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 1980 for determining the base sequences of DNA. His recent research has concentrated on the structure of genes and the evolution of DNA sequences. In this Webcast, Dr Gilbert tells us how physicists have helped drive discoveries in molecular biology, and the relationship between private and university research efforts.

00:24:51
Dr. Sydney Brenner won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 2002 for his work with the tiny nematode, C. elegans. Dr. Brenner recruited the one-millimeter worm in the early sixties as the ideal model organism to study cell differentiation and organ development. In this program, he describes how new model organisms are established for studying basic physiology, recounts his reaction to seeing Watson and Crick's DNA model for the first time, and offers advice to young scientists just starting out.

1:23:34
Eames Demetrios, grandson of Charles Eames, has been director of the Eames office since 1993. Author, lecturer, multimedia designer, and filmmaker, his most recent book, An Eames Primer, is an intimate and informative look at the philosophy and spirit behind the work of Charles and Ray Eames.

1:14:27
Founding Dean of the Architecture Program at California College of Arts and Crafts (CCAC), David Meckel began his career in the Eames Office in the 1970's. Focusing on the day to day experiences of working with Charles and Ray Eames, David will portray a day in the life of the office with the images, people, and idiosyncratic pleasures that made up the rich and dynamic environment that served as the laboratory for these two great designers.

1:12:03
In a broad-ranging look at the impact of Eames design on contemporary culture, Steve Cabella hosts a discussion with Joseph Rosa, Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.