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00:15:45
What would it take for humans to travel to and live on Mars—and who is daring enough to do it? In this episode, we explore the Mars One project, which is planning human settlement on the red planet, and hear from scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center about adjusting to the Martian environment. We also meet some brave Bay Area residents who are hoping to make the journey.

00:01:30
At the Exploratorium, we are always experimenting. In this video, watch a close-up vantage of a bicycle trip along Crissy Field in San Francisco's Presidio.

00:04:05
Check out this video made by the Field Trip Explainers, and get a sense of what to expect during your Exploratorium field trip.

Join the Exploratorium as we connect live for the first time with NOAA's newest ship, the Okeanos Explorer. The Okeanos is on its maiden voyage, traveling from Hawaii to Indonesia. We will talk with scientists on the ship and discover what kind of research they are conducting.

00:22:00
Walter Kitundu, 2008 MacArthur Fellow and longtime Exploratorium friend, is an accomplished instrument builder, musician and artist. He is also a dedicated bird watcher and photographer. In this program we accompany Walter on a birdwalk, then have a chat about birds, art, and the perils and rewards of being an urban naturalist.

00:01:21
Kenn Borek Basler(s) (more accurately called a Turbo DC-3) at the Williams Field which services McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

00:10:47
We tour the NOAA Atmospheric Research Observatory at the South Pole where scientists are monitoring carbon dioxide levels, CFCs, solar radiation, and the ozone hole.

00:01:35
Shots of the research pen at the Cape Royds adelie penguin colony.

00:25:19
Meet marine biologist George Matsumoto from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and learn about the floating ecosytems that thrive around icebergs in Antarctic waters.

00:02:30
The POLENET project takes scientists all over the continent to install equipment, and to get there they leave from Williams Field, an airport near McMurdo Station. Willy Field has a runway equipped to handle the largest aircraft that fly into Antarctica. However, this runway is different; there's no pavement here - this runway is made of ice. POLENET's Stephanie Konfal gives us a look at Willy Field.