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00:04:45
Virgin America's Captain Christopher Owens gives us a tour of their high-tech flight simulator used for pilot training and reveals just why simulation is an effective learning tool.

00:06:20
Take to the skies on board the zeppelin Eureka with pilot Andrea Deyling of Airship Ventures and get a crash-free course in lighter-than-air flight: What’s the difference between an airship, a blimp, and a zeppelin? How do they stay aloft? How high and how fast can they fly? Airship Ventures operates the only commercial passenger airship operation in the United States. To find out more go to www.airshipventures.com.

04:00
Biologist Kristina Yu and exhibit developer Denise King share their love for the mighty (and mightily underappreciated) microorganism.

00:02:45
At the South Pole, the Ice Stories crew met up with correspondent Zoe Courville just before she and her team embarked on their 3,000 km traverse across the desolate and frigid East Antarctic Ice Sheet. In this video, Zoe gives us a tour of the vehicles they are taking on their cross-continent journey, including their living module, sleeping quarters, and science sled.

00:02:58
A Kenn Borek Basler (Turbo DC-3) taxis, takes-off, and flies low back over the field at Williams Airfield outside McMurdo Station, Antarctica

00:07:06
Our Exploratorium team talks to scientists from POLENET (Polar Earth Observing Network).

00:01:21
Kenn Borek Basler(s) (more accurately called a Turbo DC-3) at the Williams Field which services McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

00:49:29
Our intrepid Exploratorium team shares experiences from their visit to Shackleton's hut. This hut is at Cape Royds, where Shackleton mounted an expedition to the South Pole and made a first ascent of Mt. Erebus.

00:20.15
We take a tour of Black Island, and speak with Tony Marchetti who for the last 13 years has been running this vital communications station for the U.S. Antarctic operations.

00:02:30
The POLENET project takes scientists all over the continent to install equipment, and to get there they leave from Williams Field, an airport near McMurdo Station. Willy Field has a runway equipped to handle the largest aircraft that fly into Antarctica. However, this runway is different; there's no pavement here - this runway is made of ice. POLENET's Stephanie Konfal gives us a look at Willy Field.