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00:01:23
Mechanical Engineer Armen Toorian explains that the wheel tracks of the Mars rover Curiosity are used to determine how far the rover has travelled on the red planet.

Virtual Worlds are social spaces--music and dancing are ubiquitous, and so we made an exhibit that mixes a unique color for every avatar into a blend of colors when they dance together.

6:50
How do cancer cells misbehave? Watch and listen as cancer researcher Dr. Thea Tlsty explains how genetic blips turn cancer cells into the rogues they are.

00:22:30
Dr. Eric Lander, a leading figure in the Human Genome Project and director of the Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, tells us about the recently completed mouse genome and how the study of other genomes gives key information about human genetics and evolution.

12:28:42
Dr. James Watson is the President of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and the co-discoverer of the double helix, for which he won a Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1962. Dr. Watson was also the first director of the Human Genome Project. He talks with us about early discoveries in molecular biology, the Human Genome Project, and what makes Cold Spring Harbor a unique scientific institution.

00:18:34
Dr. Carol Greider is a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University. She worked with molecular biologist Elizabeth Blackburn to discover the role of telomeres—segments of DNA that protect and stabilize the ends of chromosomes. Dr. Greider tells us about her work and shares her thoughts about the importance of mentors for women in science.

00:25:57
Dr. Walter Gilbert, a physicist who turned to molecular biology in 1960, won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 1980 for determining the base sequences of DNA. His recent research has concentrated on the structure of genes and the evolution of DNA sequences. In this Webcast, Dr Gilbert tells us how physicists have helped drive discoveries in molecular biology, and the relationship between private and university research efforts.

00:24:51
Dr. Sydney Brenner won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 2002 for his work with the tiny nematode, C. elegans. Dr. Brenner recruited the one-millimeter worm in the early sixties as the ideal model organism to study cell differentiation and organ development. In this program, he describes how new model organisms are established for studying basic physiology, recounts his reaction to seeing Watson and Crick's DNA model for the first time, and offers advice to young scientists just starting out.

0:59:17
This informative programming includes dispatches from the Young Women's Health Conference, a Webcast on breast cancer, and teen perspectives on pregnancy and gay issues.