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00:01:02
Dr. Paul Doherty will give you a demonstration on how the sun can burn a hole in your retina if you don't take the proper procausions when viewing a Solar Eclipse. Remember: Never look directly at the sun, even during a Partial Eclipse! To learn more about eclipses and safe viewing techniques, check out the various articles and videos on our Eclipse website. http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/

00:02:52
The Exploratorium has been bringing solar eclipses to world-wide audiences via live broadcasts since 1998. We'll be on site again to capture the 2016 Total Solar Eclipse from the remote Micronesian island of Woleai. Join us live from Micronesia on March 8, 2016 at 5 p.m. PST either online or at the Exploratorium’s free event! www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/ We’ll also be broadcasting the 2017 eclipse; Stay tuned for more details!

00:00:45
On March 8, 2016, 5pm PST the Exploratorium will present a live webcast of the total solar eclipse in Micronesia. Join us here online or in person at the Exploratorium.

00:01:45
Whether you want to call it a “Blood Moon”, “Harvest Moon” or a “Supermoon” ...the rare total Lunar Eclipse happening on September 27th hasn't happened in 32 years, and won't happen again for another 18 years. If you are on the west coast the eclipse will begin at 7:11 p.m. PDT Sunday evening and will last one hour and 12 minutes.

00:06:30
On February 26, 1998, a total solar eclipse darkened skies in a swath stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic, across the Caribbean. From the island of Aruba, an Exploratorium team presented a live Webcast of this celestial event. At the time, Webcasting technology was in its infancy, and this first live Webcast ever of a solar eclipse broke existing records for the number of viewers. Watch the archived Webcast here, or just click on the images below for still photos of eclipse highlights.

00:30:00
We are thrilled to host Hubble Imaging expert, Zolt Levay, from the Space Telescope Institute for a discussion about the science and art of translating Hubble's data into colorful photographs of the cosmic landscape.

00:20:00
5 years and 5 servicing missions have provided scientists and the public with unprecedented views of our universe. From objects as close as our solar system to the furthest reaches of the Universe, we’ll look at some of these images and discuss what it took to get them.

00:25:00
Behold beryllium, an exceptionally light, strong metal that is both prized and poisonous. Found in minerals such as emeralds and other forms of beryl, beryllium is highly conductive to heat and electricity, nonmagnetic, capable of great elasticity, and impervious to a wide range of temperatures, making it a favored material for aerospace projects such as space shuttles and satellites. In this video you will discover the element’s ancient and atomic histories with host Ron Hipschman!

00:31:00
Join Dr. Jay Daniel, Director of Engineering at L-3 Integrated Optical Systems Tinsley, to explore beryllium’s central role in the future James Webb Space Telescope.

00:10:47
Cities are known to produce a lot of light pollution, making it a challenge for astronomy enthusiasts to view the heavens within city limits. For us in the SF Bay Area, these issues apply, however, exciting results can still be attained between sky gazing and learning about how we all fit into this big thing we call "space". Urban Astronomer Paul Salazar, The Exploratorium's very own Adam Esposito and more demonstrate how to deal with the parameters and the unforgettable experiences that await with simple to no equipment, the right conditions, and some decent timing.