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00:10:47
Cities are known to produce a lot of light pollution, making it a challenge for astronomy enthusiasts to view the heavens within city limits. For us in the SF Bay Area, these issues apply, however, exciting results can still be attained between sky gazing and learning about how we all fit into this big thing we call "space". Urban Astronomer Paul Salazar, The Exploratorium's very own Adam Esposito and more demonstrate how to deal with the parameters and the unforgettable experiences that await with simple to no equipment, the right conditions, and some decent timing.

00:07:10
Seasonal cycles and winter storms bring extra-high "king tides" that can swamp coastal structures and habitats. What’s a coastal dweller to do? Take pictures! It’s no joke: Educators from the California King Tides Initiative explain how citizen snapshots can be of real value to researchers and policy makers.

00:03:50
At the southern end of the Golden Gate Bridge, a construction project to rebuild the elevated freeway ramp formerly known as Doyle Drive is underway. Senior bridge engineer John Walters tours us through some of the new seismic technologies being installed, including a seismic joint designed to handle several feet of longitudinal movement and a spherical bearing that allows for three-dimensional movement. Walters also points out a temporary structure built over the historic Presidio Pet Cemetery to protect the grave sites while providing a platform for the construction overhead.

00:04:22
For John Edmark, geometry is a foundation for creating beauty. Here he explains his interest in unexpected natural phenemona, and how visitors to his kaleidoscopic piece, The Geometron, can turn simple shapes into surprisingly intricate patterns of reflection.

01:28:01
John Cage was one of the most influential composers in modern American music. He raised fundamental questions about the nature of music, and invigorated, provoked, and perplexed audiences throughout his long career. In this lecture from 1987, excerpts of his work are played and discussed. Afterwards, Cage takes questions and shares his thoughts on subjects ranging from the origins of his impulse to make music-"Many composers hear music before they write it, but I write music in order to hear it"-to using chance to create without ego or intention. He asks why we should listen to music instead of just listening to the sounds around us, and answers: "There's no reason."

00:01:20
Meet some of the notable artists featured in the Speaking of Music Rewind preview: Brian Eno, Sarah Hopkins, Trimpin, Pamela Z, John Cage, Philip Glass, and Laurie Anderson.

00:58:32
Watch ancient text revealed and read for the first time in a thousand years! Archimedes was one of the world's greatest scientific and mathematical minds. His thoughts were inscribed on goatskin parchment, but the letters and diagrams were scraped off and written over by Greek monks in the Middle Ages. Now, using an intense x-ray beam generated at Stanford University's linear accelerator, some of the original Greek text will be revealed for the first time in the modern world.

00:35:48
In an exclusive taped interview, Hubble payload commander and astronaut John Grunsfeld discusses how astronauts who'll be servicing a telescope in space train in a giant pool at the Johnson Space Center. We'll also show an interview with space engineer Amy Ross, filmed in the space suit laboratory at Johnson.

1:58:50
This episode of Sedge Thomson's West Coast Live radio show explores the places where science and entertainment intersect. In this broadcast: Singer-songwriter John Gorka; Bert Grant, founder of Grant's Brewery; a view from the studio of artist Meredith Tromble; author of "Fisherman's Son" Michael Koepf.