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00:30:00
Tardigrades are amazing creatures that can withstand the most extreme conditions on Earth, as well as the vacuum of space! This unique and charismatic animal has the ability to survive in a variety of situations. In today's program, Exploratorium scientist Karen Kalumuck will continue our programming about life in extreme environments as it relates to the search for 'habitability' on Mars.

Most things won't burn on Mars—after all, the main ingredient in the Martian atmosphere, carbon dioxide, is used in fire extinguishers on earth. So how would one create fire without oxygen? Use metal!This slow motion footage shows magnesium burning within a block of dry ice.

00:04:06
TI staff educator Eric Muller demonstrates a “cool” thing to do with dry ice, and it even relates to the standards!

00:05:59
TI staff educator Eric Muller hits me up for change, and then demonstrates a neat science activity using dry ice.

00:02:58
A Kenn Borek Basler (Turbo DC-3) taxis, takes-off, and flies low back over the field at Williams Airfield outside McMurdo Station, Antarctica

00:07:06
Our Exploratorium team talks to scientists from POLENET (Polar Earth Observing Network).

00:01:21
Kenn Borek Basler(s) (more accurately called a Turbo DC-3) at the Williams Field which services McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

00:04:28
In this interview from in front of the Canada Glacier in Antarctica’s Taylor Valley, Hassan Basagic from Portland State University describes the essential role of polar glaciers in supporting the bare-bones ecosystems in the Dry Valleys.

00:49:29
Our intrepid Exploratorium team shares experiences from their visit to Shackleton's hut. This hut is at Cape Royds, where Shackleton mounted an expedition to the South Pole and made a first ascent of Mt. Erebus.

00:02:30
The POLENET project takes scientists all over the continent to install equipment, and to get there they leave from Williams Field, an airport near McMurdo Station. Willy Field has a runway equipped to handle the largest aircraft that fly into Antarctica. However, this runway is different; there's no pavement here - this runway is made of ice. POLENET's Stephanie Konfal gives us a look at Willy Field.