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Join the Exploratorium's very own Ken Finn as he demonstrates fun activities, mixing up science with items found around the house.

Have you ever really listened to a ball bounce? Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey describes the elegant mathematics of a bouncing ball.

Despite my better judgment, I invite TI staff educator Eric Muller to do one more set of activities—several things you can do with soda straws.

Exhibit developer Erik Thogersen backs away from the Giant Mirror. Watch his image change as he passes through the focal point, then continues on past the center of curvature.

At the Giant Mirror, Senior Staff Scientist Paul Doherty demonstrates a simple way of locating a real image—an image that floats in space in front of the mirror.

Senior Staff Scientist Thomas Humphrey invents a simple experiment to see if the Giant Mirror is spherical or parabolic, and then to see if it's perfectly spherical. By placing a Styrofoam ball at the center of curvature, he's able to prove that the mirror is out of pure sphericity by about one-quarter of one degree.

Staff Neuroscientist Richard Brown demonstrates that the Giant Mirror reflects infrared radiation as well as visible light.

Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off. Teachers compete before a live audience at the Exploratorium for the revered title, "Iron Science Teacher." This week's secret ingredient: batteries.

How big does a mirror have to be for you to see yourself in it? Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey describes an activity you can use in your classroom to investigate simple optics.

TI staff educator Eric Muller hits me up for change, and then demonstrates a neat science activity using dry ice.