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00:30:00
Join us for a live webcast with senior scientist Paul Doherty to discuss breaking news about the Rosetta Mission! The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission deployed its lander, Philae, to the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on November 12. 2014. Philae’s landing site, currently known as Site J, is located on the smaller of the comet’s two ‘lobes’, with a backup site on the larger lobe. The sites were selected just six weeks after Rosetta arrived at the comet on August 6, following its 10-year journey through the Solar System.

00:30:00
The race to find Philae's landing site could only begin once Rosetta arrived at comet, 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on August 6th, when the comet was seen close-up for the first time. Since then, the spacecraft has moved to within 30 km of the comet, affording more detailed scientific measurements of the candidate sites. In parallel, the operations and flight dynamics teams have been exploring options for delivering the lander to all five candidate landing sites. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist, Isabel Hawkins for a live webcast detailing the amazing stages of the Rosetta Mission!

00:49:00
Join us as Rosetta moves ever closer to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s nucleus to map potential sites for a November landing.

00:30:00
The most difficult phase of the Rosetta mission is the final rendezvous with the fast-moving comet. Learn what steps the ESA scientists and engineers are taking to ensure a successful landing for November 2014.

00:25:00
Join Exploratorium scientist Paul Doherty as he illuminates the most primitive objects—comets, icy leftovers from the formation of our solar system over 4.6 billion years ago.

00:25:50
Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a live webcast as they share information about the Rosetta Mission, which is due to be "woken up" on January 20th, 2014. Rosetta is a spacecraft en route to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted.