Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Watch the Exploratorium's construction process from December 2010 to November 2012 in under two minutes. Come see for yourself—doors open at Pier 15 on April 17, 2013. http://press.exploratorium.edu/exploratoriums-net-zero-energy-goal-for-new-waterfront-home-2013/ Images courtesy of Ken Murphy. Music by Wayne Grim.

Come out to play on the concrete slides at Seward Street Mini Park in the Castro. A series of speed tests guided by physicist Paul Doherty takes on the question asked by sliders everywhere: How can I go faster?

This After Dark event examined time's many faces through activities and presentations featuring honeybees, jump-shot photography, antique timepieces, and a performance by Gamelan Sari Raras.

The Exploratorium Eclipse team drives back to Urumqi with our partners from XJTV, after the live broadcast. It was pretty hot, probably above 40 °C most of the way, and a 14 hour drive. This is a time-compressed video of of the trip out to the Weizi Gorge (Yiwu) along China’s cloud-covered Silk Road.

Ken Murphy, creator of A History of the Sky— a time-lapse visualization that will span an entire year—talks about his project during the After Dark event, Resolution.

Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey divulges a clever way to measure the speed of sound, and he explains how he’s used that information to measure things in the world.

In this interview from Greenland, glaciologist Mark Fahnestock describes the roar of a 1000-foot iceberg dropping off the Jakobshavn Isbræ into the Ilulissat Icefjord. Includes time-lapse photography of this massive calving event.

What is dark energy? Cosmologist Rocky Kolb explains how the South Pole Telescope will help us understand the properties and nature of this mysterious force.

A century after publication of Einstein's famous papers on light and relativity, this most celebrated of Nobel Laureates will be the subject of a talk by award-winning science writer K.C. Cole. She'll discuss the ways in which Einstein continues to influence physics today, from detecting gravity waves to understanding string theory.

The concept of space-time--perhaps Einstein's most fundamental contribution to our understanding of the universe--will be explored using special red lasers.