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00:20:24
Learn how the mix of saltwater and freshwater in the San Francisco Bay affects its diverse ecosystems with John Largier, professor of coastal oceanography at the University of California, Davis.

00:38:13
Essential, explosive sodium is a soft, silvery alkali metal that roils in water, releasing clouds of hydrogen gas that fan its yellow flames. It reacts with most elements, and is naturally found only in compounds, such as sodium chloride, or common salt. Ancient Egyptians knew sodium from natron, a mix of salts prized for cleaning, personal hygiene, and preservation, particularly in mummification. Humphry Davy first isolated the element from caustic soda in 1807, naming it sodium; Jakob Berzelius preferred natrium, hence its symbol (Na). As a metal, liquid sodium cools nuclear reactors, and sodium-vapor lamps bathe streets at night in yellow, monochromatic light.

00:20:00
Emerging from inside of stars, carbon is the fourth most abundant element in the universe, and the basis for all life on Earth. Polyamorous, it loves to bond, exchanging four of its electrons with atoms of itself and other elements to create an endless variety of chemistry, from DNA chains to soccer-ball shaped fullerenes to atom-thick sheets of graphene. As diamond, carbon is hard and abrasive, as graphite, soft. When its bonds are broken, carbon readily moves from one partner to the next, cycling between oceans, atmosphere, flora, fauna, soil, rocks, and fossil deposits deep below ground.

00:20:00
See live flameworking with Russell Taylor of Public Glass, and find out why borosilicate glass is used for both lab equipment and intricately beautiful artwork.

00:30:00
Follow the trail of this intriguing element through ceramics, cleaning agents, fireworks, nuclear reactors, and nanotubes. Get a primer on quantum mechanics, play with slime, and see live flameworking with Russell Taylor of Public Glass.

00:04:05
On the cliffs above San Francisco's Ocean Beach perches a landmark observatory—a giant camera obscura. Step inside with Robert Tacchetto and see how this centuries-old technology creates enchanting images of the outside world.

1:09:46
Watch as the best teachers on the planet battle it out for the title of Iron Science Teacher. In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity. Tee off with this week’s “secret” ingredient-salt!

1:00:07
Watch as the best teachers on the planet battle it out for the title of Iron Science Teacher. In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity. This week’s “secret” ingredient: food coloring!