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See the highlights of totality from the total solar eclipse of March 8/9 2016! The Exploratorium and NASA went to Woleai, a tiny atoll in the Federated States of Micronesia, where we broadcast the eclipse live. Totality began at 11:38 a.m. on March 9 in Woleai, Micronesia, which was 5:38 p.m. on March 8 in San Francisco.

This hands-on science video explains Einstein���s light-bending concept using nothing more than a wine glass and an LED light representing a star.

Dr. Paul Doherty will give you a demonstration on how the sun can burn a hole in your retina if you don't take the proper procausions when viewing a Solar Eclipse. Remember: Never look directly at the sun, even during a Partial Eclipse! To learn more about eclipses and safe viewing techniques, check out the various articles and videos on our Eclipse website. http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/

The legendary Joshua Light Show returns to the Exploratorium���s Kanbar Forum to improvise an immersive, otherworldly environment of light in collaboration with acclaimed musicians Julia Holter and Linda Perhacs.

For John Edmark, geometry is a foundation for creating beauty. Here he explains his interest in unexpected natural phenemona, and how visitors to his kaleidoscopic piece, The Geometron, can turn simple shapes into surprisingly intricate patterns of reflection.

The Exploratorium Eclipse team drives back to Urumqi with our partners from XJTV, after the live broadcast. It was pretty hot, probably above 40 ��C most of the way, and a 14 hour drive. This is a time-compressed video of of the trip out to the Weizi Gorge (Yiwu) along China���s cloud-covered Silk Road.

Exhibit developer Erik Thogersen backs away from the Giant Mirror. Watch his image change as he passes through the focal point, then continues on past the center of curvature.

At the Giant Mirror, Senior Staff Scientist Paul Doherty demonstrates a simple way of locating a real image���an image that floats in space in front of the mirror.

Senior Staff Scientist Thomas Humphrey invents a simple experiment to see if the Giant Mirror is spherical or parabolic, and then to see if it's perfectly spherical. By placing a Styrofoam ball at the center of curvature, he's able to prove that the mirror is out of pure sphericity by about one-quarter of one degree.

Staff Neuroscientist Richard Brown demonstrates that the Giant Mirror reflects infrared radiation as well as visible light.