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00:35:00
Thrown from supernovae, silicon is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and second only to oxygen in the Earth’s crust, which is primarily comprised of silicate compounds, including silica (SiO2), or quartz, commonly found in sand. Silica is absorbed by plants and transformed into intricate glass shells by radiolarians and other microscopic marine creatures. Humans, for their part, have worked silica into glass, ceramics, and devices such as phonograph pickups and crystal oscillators for clocks.

00:24:00
Thrown from supernovae, silicon is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and second only to oxygen in the Earth’s crust, which is primarily comprised of silicate compounds, including silica (SiO2), or quartz, commonly found in sand. Silica is absorbed by plants and transformed into intricate glass shells by radiolarians and other microscopic marine creatures. Humans, for their part, have worked silica into glass, ceramics, and devices such as phonograph pickups and crystal oscillators for clocks. Join Exploratorium exhibit developer, Denise King, as she explores the magic of biogenic silica.

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution.

00:00:30
Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen The Exploratorium Friday, May 27– Monday, September 5, 2016 Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:32:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. While successfully isolated by Hans Christian Ørsted in 1825 and Friedrich Wöhler in 1827, metallic aluminum remained hard to obtain until the end of the nineteenth century, when a new smelting process made it inexpensive to produce. Find out more about aluminum from Exploratorium scientist, Ron Hipschman.

00:25:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. Find out more about aluminum from Mara Holt Skov, a design professor from California College of the the Arts.

03:00:00
For the solar eclipse of 2016, the Exploratorium was on the island of Woleai, in Micronesia, with multiple telescopes trained on the sun. These telescopes were connected to a laptop holding custom-made software that looks at the movement of the moon and the brightness of the sun. Composer Wayne Grim used this software to create a live composition based on the data. The musical composition uses rotational and orbital periods of the Earth, moon, and sun as formal elements.

00:12:06
For the solar eclipse of 2016, the Exploratorium was on the island of Woleai, in Micronesia, with multiple telescopes trained on the sun. These telescopes were connected to a laptop holding custom-made software that looks at the movement of the moon and the brightness of the sun. Composer Wayne Grim used this software to create a live composition based on the data. The musical composition uses rotational and orbital periods of the Earth, moon, and sun as formal elements. Here is an excerpt from the 3 hour piece.

00:01:24
In this video, Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty explains why you rarely see a true scale model of the Earth, sun, and moon. Understanding the true scale of the solar system helps us appreciate the rarity of total solar eclipses: it’s unusual when objects at such distances line up perfectly.