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00:10:45
With the ever shifting boundaries between humans and wildlife in the Bay Area, the daily routine for many has it's challenges and rewards for all involved. Based on biological studies and direct experiences, we focus on a few of our favorite neighboring species who interact with us humans, and our way of life, in more ways than you may think.

00:20:00
As cameras became more sophisticated, so too did our understanding of projective geometry. In this brief talk, we’ll explore how the art of photography has helped reveal the elegant mathematics of vision.

00:03:23
Join the Exploratorium's very own Ken Finn as he demonstrates fun activities, mixing up science with items found around the house.

00:02:12
Join the Exploratorium's very own Ken Finn as he demonstrates fun activities, mixing up science with items found around the house.

00:05:00
Curious about Tofu? The folks over at Hodo Soy Beanery tell us everything we ever wanted to know about how Tofu (and its "sexier cousin" Yuba) is made. Music by Wayne Grim For more information on Hodo Soy Beanery- http://hodosoy.com

01:43:00
“They Say They Want to Bring Me in Guilty”: On the Need to Make Forensic Identification 'Science' Scientific

00:01:37
On January 30, 2015, the Exploratorium Lab hosted its fifth annual Science of Cocktails event. More than 1,200 guests sipped creative concoctions; explored the biology, chemistry, and physics of craft cocktails; and enjoyed the museum's hands-on exhibits and activities.

00:06:00
Navigating bustling city streets can be a challenge for anyone at times. Can you imagine crossing a busy street, walking up a flight of stairs or using public transportation without the gift of sight? In this Science in the City you'll catch a glimpse of how Guide Dogs for the Blind envisions a world with greater inclusion, opportunity, and independence by optimizing the unique capabilities of people and dogs.

00:22:00
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 An element for the modern age, lightweight lithium is commonly used in rechargeable batteries, fireworks, and medications for treating bipolar disorder. Lithium is highly reactive, and has served as a fuel source for nuclear weapons as well as a cooling agent in nuclear reactors. See its scarlet contributions to pyrotechnics, and discuss its divided reputation as being both restorative and potentially toxic to our health.

00:25:00
Recorded live at the Exploratorium 2015 In a recent study by the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Dr. Julie Andersen found that low doses of lithium prevented Parkinson's symptoms in aged mice with a human mutation for the disease. Join Dr. Andersen to learn more about her research, and lithium’s potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.