Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:02:14
While hiking back from a research site near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, Ice Stories correspondent Billy D'Andrea happened upon a Peregrine Falcon scrape. Two falcons, not too thrilled that he was passing by their cliff-side nest, began circling and screaming to chase him off. In this video, listen for the sound of Wheatears (songbirds) chirping and yipping in the foreground.

00:01:09
Shots of the calving front of the Jakobsavn Glacier, Greenland's fastest moving glacier. Includes two shots of Mark Fahnestock's helicopter flying over.

00:03:15
Climate researcher Billy D'Andrea and colleagues explore the remote "back lakes" of Greenland.

00:03:36
To understand how Earth’s climate system has changed over time, scientists need to find, develop and use natural recorders of temperature and precipitation. One natural thermometer comes in the form of alkenones: trans-fats produced by certain algae.

00:48:10
In this zany competition teachers have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special secret ingredient. This week: hair care products!

00:03:18
Dr. Bart Kempenaers, a behavioral ecologist from the Max Planck Institiute of Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, and his team fashion fake Sandpiper eggs, swap them for the real ones in the nest and incubate them in their lab at BASC’s (Barrow Arctic Science Consortium) new research facility. Once the hatchlings emerge, they take samples from them to determine factors such as paternity. The chicks are then returned to the nest, without the mother batting a feather.

00:03:08
What does a ringed seal’s breathing hole look like and how do you find one on a vast sheet of sea ice? Dr. Brendan Kelly uses the canine skills of Cooper, a Black Labrador he trained to chase the scent of ringed seals and point to their holes. Passionate about wildlife and climate change, Melanie Duchin has loaned her dog to work with Brendan for the past 5 years.

00:31:00
Alaska's coastal range is covered in literally thousands of thaw lakes. Ken Hinkel, Yongwei Sheng and John Lenters are embarking on a project to reveal the subtle energy dynamics that take place within these lake systems.