Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:35:00
Thrown from supernovae, silicon is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and second only to oxygen in the Earth’s crust, which is primarily comprised of silicate compounds, including silica (SiO2), or quartz, commonly found in sand. Silica is absorbed by plants and transformed into intricate glass shells by radiolarians and other microscopic marine creatures. Humans, for their part, have worked silica into glass, ceramics, and devices such as phonograph pickups and crystal oscillators for clocks.

00:24:00
Thrown from supernovae, silicon is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and second only to oxygen in the Earth’s crust, which is primarily comprised of silicate compounds, including silica (SiO2), or quartz, commonly found in sand. Silica is absorbed by plants and transformed into intricate glass shells by radiolarians and other microscopic marine creatures. Humans, for their part, have worked silica into glass, ceramics, and devices such as phonograph pickups and crystal oscillators for clocks. Join Exploratorium exhibit developer, Denise King, as she explores the magic of biogenic silica.

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution.

00:00:30
Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen The Exploratorium Friday, May 27– Monday, September 5, 2016 Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:55:10
The fields of science and the law pervade modern society, and yet largely exist in separate spheres. Where scientists seek truth, the law seeks justice, two laudable goals, but which often overlap only marginally. Clearly the law works with different objectives, values, and timetables than does science. And science can never say what is fair and just. However, in today’s technological world, science has become, and will forevermore be, a legal tool for justice.

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:32:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. While successfully isolated by Hans Christian Ørsted in 1825 and Friedrich Wöhler in 1827, metallic aluminum remained hard to obtain until the end of the nineteenth century, when a new smelting process made it inexpensive to produce. Find out more about aluminum from Exploratorium scientist, Ron Hipschman.

00:25:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. Find out more about aluminum from Mara Holt Skov, a design professor from California College of the the Arts.

00:14:00
Take a peak at Duendes performing at our annual Spring Gala event in the Kanbar Forum! More than 400 guests attended the April 6 event, themed Play Is Serious Business! The gala highlighted how the Exploratorium’s creative and hands-on approach to education is essential to producing generations of confident individuals with critical thinking skills, bold creativity, and lifelong curiosity. Roberto Corrias Guitar Jose Blanco Guitar Vocals Percussion David McLean Guitar Marlon Aldana Hand Percussion /Cajon Clara Rodriguez Dancer Percussion Hand Claps

00:1:39
The warm glow of the projected image invites us to in-between worlds. During this cinematic celebration, now an annual favorite, the passive act of watching turns to listening, peering, touching, and interacting as Exploratorium Cinema Arts takes over museum spaces to provide experiences—both on and off the screen—created by artists and filmmakers from the Bay Area and beyond.