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2:53:54
A telescope-only view of the 2006 eclipse, as seen from Turkey.

00:04:43
On March 29, 2006, a total solar eclipse occurred as the moon moved directly between the earth and the sun. The moon's shadow fell on the earth, first darkening the eastern tip of Brazil, and then moved across the Atlantic Ocean to make landfall in Ghana, Africa. It continued moving northeast through Nigeria, Niger, Libya, Egypt, across the Mediterranean and into Turkey, where an Exploratorium team was waiting.

1:02:13
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special St. Patrick's Day secret ingredient-things that are green!

00:00:11
An clip of the Aeolian Landscape exhibit by artist Ned Kahn. Blowing air sculpts sand into an ever-changing landscape.

00:00:51
Witness the amazing development of live embryos at the microscope imaging station, part of the Traits of Life Collection.

00:45:13
A year and a half after entering Saturn's orbit, the Cassini spacecraft continued to gather exciting new information. Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Weygren bring us up to date on the Cassini Mission and show stunning images of Saturn and its ever-growing assortment of moons.

00:47:21
On December 11, 2005, Opportunity, one of the twin rovers exploring Mars, celebrated its first Martian birthday. Opportunity had been on the red planet 687 Earth days, which is one Martian year. (A year is the time it takes a planet to make a complete loop around the sun). Join us for a look back over the those 687 days of discovery: what we learned, what we saw, and what questions remained unanswered.

00:48:40
Searching for extraterrestrial life: is it telephoning aliens or really complicated math equations? Join Senior Scientist Paul Doherty, NASA Ames planetary Scientist Eric Wegryn, and SETI's Senior Scientist Seth Shostak as they explore how to find planets that could support life. How many of these planets are there? How did we find them? When will we know for sure?

12:44:38
This special edition of Iron Scence Teacher is part of our celebration of the Teacher Institute's 21st birthday. Watch as the best teachers on the planet battle it out for the title of Iron Science Teacher. In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity.

1:17:34
How do opera singers sing loud enough to be heard over an orchestra? Can an opera singer's voice really break a wine glass? What's the difference between a baritone and a soprano? Discover the answers to these questions—and more!—in this presentation for families. Join physicist and composer Dr. Brian Holmes and San Francisco Opera Center Director Sheri Greenawald to explore how the art and science of singing combine in opera.