Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:07:21
It’s tough for a new teacher to keep up with everything from labs to professional development. TI teacher coach Arlette Manders provides a potpourri of tips on how to make life a little easier.

00:08:30
TI staff educator Lori Lambertson explains her philosophy of integrating math and science in the classroom, and how she puts it into practice.

00:52:10
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off. Teachers compete before a live audience at the Exploratorium for the revered title, "Iron Science Teacher." This week's secret ingredient: batteries.

00:04:06
TI staff educator Eric Muller demonstrates a “cool” thing to do with dry ice, and it even relates to the standards!

00:49:07
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off. Teachers compete before a live audience at the Exploratorium for the revered title, "Iron Science Teacher." This week's secret ingredient was oil.

00:22:45
Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty and visiting scientist Alfredo Mateus for an exploration of hands-on demos. In today's webcast, Paul and Alfredo will be looking at a voice activated chemical reaction and what happens when you heat plastic in water!

00:04:48
Sarah Santos and Jeremy Rector demonstrate two ways to make ferrofluid during a live Webcast of the Exploratorium's Iron Science Teacher. Watch the whole episode (type "oil" in the search box), along with many other episodes of Iron Science Teacher at www.exploratorium.edu/tv

00:07:49
Children’s book author David Schwartz shares some creative ways kids and teachers have used his books to look at big numbers.

00:05:32
Our host, Stephanie Chasteen, shares some fun facts and activities having to do with the science of sound.

00:00:44
This is a time-lapse movie of a chain reaction activity presented at the Exploratorium booth during Maker Faire 2009. Participants were asked to build a portion of a collective chain reaction contraption, which was set off twice during the day. Photos were taken every 30 seconds and then joined in a 24 fps movie.