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00:30:00
Join us on the web or in person for a live chat with scientists and educators on board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as it uses an ROV (remotely-operated vehicle) to explore the ocean floor just offshore from the Bay Area.

00:30:00
Join us on the web or in person for a live chat with scientists and educators on board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as it uses an ROV (remotely-operated vehicle) to explore the ocean floor just offshore from the Bay Area.

00:02:38
Experience Buckyball, a towering 25-foot illuminated sculpture that features two nested, geodesic spheres. Inspired by the shape explored by futurist and inventor Buckminster Fuller, Buckyball is the creation of New York–based artist Leo Villareal, celebrated in San Francisco for his monumental public sculpture The Bay Lights. On view at the Exploratorium from March 2016- February 2017 Comprised of 4,500 LED nodes arranged along a series of pentagons and hexagons, Buckyball is animated by custom software programmed by Villareal to display over 16 million distinct colors. The lights dynamically shift and fade in both sequenced patterns and random order, generating vibrant hues that will enliven the Exploratorium’s public space in both daylight and moonlight. With a background in both sculpture and media art, Villareal's light sculpture and site-specific architectural works have been inspired by the immersive light explorations of artists such as James Turrell, Robert Irwin, and Dan Flavin. His work also builds on the computation-based, moving image experiments of artists exploring pattern and "visual music," such as John and James Whitney. The spherical, soccer ball–like form of Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes, which informs Villareal's work, was discovered in a carbon molecule by scientists in 1985. It was coined the "Buckminsterfullerene" or "Buckyball" in homage to him, and has since been avidly researched by scientists and material engineers On view at the Exploratorium from March 2016- February 2017.

00:20:00
Join us on the web or in person for a live chat with scientists and educators on board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as it uses an ROV (remotely-operated vehicle) to explore the ocean floor just offshore from the Bay Area.

00:35:00
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher." Parodying the cult Japanese TV program, "Iron Chef," the Exploratorium's Iron Science Teacher competition showcases science teachers as they devise classroom activities using a particular ingredient—an everyday item such as a plastic bag, a milk carton, or a nail.

00:25:00
Theo Jansen’s strandbeests are made up of many interesting organs. They have legs that take elegant strides. They have stomachs to store energy, allowing them to walk even when there’s no wind. They can even detect water and count their steps. Explore strandbeest anatomy and what it reveals about living creatures and the process of natural selection.

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution.

00:00:30
Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen The Exploratorium Friday, May 27– Monday, September 5, 2016 Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:00:30
Experience Strandbeest: The Dream Machines of Theo Jansen at the Exploratorium from May 27 to September 5, 2016. Jansen’s strandbeests—“beach animals” in Dutch—are enormous, self-propelling kinetic creations. Constructed largely of PVC tubing and other hardware store materials, strandbeests are mesmerizing in their motions and eerily lifelike. Equipped with sensory organs and ever-evolving survival strategies, they walk a wandering, wind-blown line between art and engineering, mechanics and biology. Physicist-turned-artist Jansen has been creating strandbeests since 1990. Iteratively designed and intricately assembled, Jansen’s self-propelled creatures have evolved over the years, becoming increasingly complex and lifelike, with specialized adaptations to help them survive in their seaside environment. On tour for the first time in North America, the exhibition is illuminated by artist sketches, immersive video, live demonstrations, and the lyrical photography of Lena Herzog, who spent more than seven years documenting the strandbeests’ evolution. http://www.exploratorium.edu/strandbeest

00:32:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. While successfully isolated by Hans Christian Ørsted in 1825 and Friedrich Wöhler in 1827, metallic aluminum remained hard to obtain until the end of the nineteenth century, when a new smelting process made it inexpensive to produce. Find out more about aluminum from Exploratorium scientist, Ron Hipschman.