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00:32:49
Join us for a live Webcast exploring eggs! Eggs are cells – the largest cells. We all come from eggs. Come explore the wondrous workings of eggs with staff biologists including naked eggs, de-shelled to demonstrate osmosis, sea urchin egg fertilization, life inside an egg using chick embryos, and other ova-vations to discover their amazing properties.

00:05:27
Learn how to build a version of a Brazilian instrument called the cuica, which demonstrates principles of sound. This podcast was created collaboratively in a teacher workshop at the Exploratorium.

00:03:28
TI postdoctoral fellow Julie Yu explains what a stem cell is and why they’re important.

00:08:43
TI teacher coach Rilla Chaney says she’s no singer, but she’s successfully used songs to teach science concepts in her classroom.

00:38:06
Celebrate Pi Day— an international holiday born at San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Join us for a live webcast where we examine the nature of everyone's favorite mathmatical constant, 3.1415926535…ad infinitum!

00:19:33
What makes one individual "fitter" than another? Staff scientist Karen Kalumuck introduces natural selection, then four teams of "predators" compete with each other for prey.Who will thrive and who will face extinction?

00:00:55
Why do the hands on clocks go "clockwise?" Seems like a circular definition, but if you looked closely at sundials in the northern hemisphere, you'd notice that the shadow of the sun moves around the sundial in a "clockwise" direction. This was adopted by clock-makers and became the standard we know today. In the southern hemisphere, the sun's shadow moves around the dial in the opposite direction, so if clocks had been invented there, our watches would move the other way.

00:49:29
Our intrepid Exploratorium team shares experiences from their visit to Shackleton's hut. This hut is at Cape Royds, where Shackleton mounted an expedition to the South Pole and made a first ascent of Mt. Erebus.

00:38:04
We talk to photographer John Weller, who spent the austral summer 2008 scuba diving under the ice in Antarctica.

00:00:28
The air is so dry here at McMurdo that anything that gets charged, stays charged. Moist air quickly discharges objects because the water in the air picks up charge from an object and quickly flies away, taking charges with it. This does not happen here. We are constantly getting shocks from our clothing, our bedding and when we exit vehicles.