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00:29:48
The time has come! The Curiosity rover will be landing on the planet Mars on August 5, 2012. The Exploratorium crew did a special live webcast from the museum floor at our evening program for adults, called After Dark. Join us as we get the lowdown on the Mars mission!

00:02:02
The Exploratorium is more than a science museum. It is the global leader in informal learning, having spawned 1000 participatory science centers around the world. An estimated 180 million people play with our creations in museums around the globe and online. The Exploratorium is made up of scientists, artists, teachers and tinkerers. It is a public laboratory where visitors are encouraged to ask questions, experiment, and ultimately see the world a little differently.

00:58:00
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher."

00:04:05
On the cliffs above San Francisco's Ocean Beach perches a landmark observatory—a giant camera obscura. Step inside with Robert Tacchetto and see how this centuries-old technology creates enchanting images of the outside world.

00:40:00
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher."

00:40:00
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher." Secret ingredient-

00:07:19
At the 35th Annual Awards Dinner on May 8, 2012, the Exploratorium celebrated its 40 year history at the Palace of Fine Arts. This video gives an historical look at the Exploratorium and its place in the Bay Area's fabric of innovation.

00:03:15
Join Dr. Russell Schnell, the director of the Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as he talks about what it takes to monitor climate change.

00:04:20
Learn about NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory on the Big Island of Hawaii, the location of the Exploratorium’s June 5, 2012, webcast of the transit of Venus. A leading atmospheric research facility, the observatory has been collecting and monitoring data relating to atmospheric change since the 1950s. Dr John Barnes, the Station Chief for the observatory, describes the functions of the MLO, which provides valuable long-term and continuous recording of data.

00:03:16
Dr. John Barnes, Station Manager of NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory, shares the history of Charles Keeling's pioneering carbon dioxide measurements, which have been taken continually at Mauna Loa since 1958.