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00:22:00
Walter Kitundu, 2008 MacArthur Fellow and longtime Exploratorium friend, is an accomplished instrument builder, musician and artist. He is also a dedicated bird watcher and photographer. In this program we accompany Walter on a birdwalk, then have a chat about birds, art, and the perils and rewards of being an urban naturalist.

00:15:41
Dr. Christine Carter is a sociologist who studies the childhood roots of happiness. She is the executive director of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, an interdisciplinary research center that promotes the study of happiness, compassion, and altruism. In this program, Dr. Carter speaks about happiness, altruism, and the inspiring intersection of her personal and professional worlds.

00:04:28
In this interview from in front of the Canada Glacier in Antarctica’s Taylor Valley, Hassan Basagic from Portland State University describes the essential role of polar glaciers in supporting the bare-bones ecosystems in the Dry Valleys.

00:25:19
Meet marine biologist George Matsumoto from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and learn about the floating ecosytems that thrive around icebergs in Antarctic waters.

00:22:40
They say that love makes the world go around--but love can make you loco, too. This compelling audio documentary weaves together obsessions, confessions, and reflections to explore the universal madness of love.

00:03:07
Geneticist Mark Stoneking discusses a special type of genetic material called mitochondrial DNA gets passed directly from mother to child. Largely unchanged from generation to generation, this genetic material gives researchers a way to track populations back in time.

00:01:30
Evolutionary geneticist Ed Green discusses the key questions researchers hope to answer by analyzing the Neanderthal genome.

00:00:59
Anthropologist Tanya Smith explains that invisible microstructure inside teeth creates a durable record of life history, including events such as birth, illness, famine, stress, and death.

00:01:53
Anthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin explains that unlike teeth, bones undergo a lifelong process called remodeling, in which they are constantly being destroyed and recreated.

00:02:25
Anthropologist Philipp Gunz explains the process of virtual fossil reconstruction, a technique that can reverse the damage done to fossils by time and the elements.