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01:45:00
In 1991, using powerful magnets and “sewer pipe, wire, epoxy, and finger tapping,”* a few research groups converged on the idea of utilizing the magnetic resonance properties of gray matter to image the active, thinking human brain—what the world now knows as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Since then, cognitive neuroscience has developed apace, with an explosion of ingenious techniques and sophisticated tools. Each new advance is greeted with a chorus of scholarly and popular speculation on its potential application to other arenas of human endeavor. Discussions about the ‘promise of neuroscience’ are often tinged with a mixture of hope and fear. Nowhere is this ambivalence more evident than in the courts, as conjecture runs rampant about the legal impact of this research, stoked by claims that neuroscience may soon detect liars, objectively determine criminal responsibility, quantify suffering, and predict violence. But is neuroscience ready for courtroom use? Does brain imaging permit us to measure a person’s feelings, thoughts, and intentions? Can jurors understand and effectively weigh neuroscientific evidence? Please join host David Faigman along with Dr. Kent Kiehl of the University of New Mexico and Professor Amanda Pustilnik of the University of Maryland and Harvard University to discuss the fascinating and wide-ranging challenges posed by the use of contemporary neuroscience in the courtroom.

01:43:00
“They Say They Want to Bring Me in Guilty”: On the Need to Make Forensic Identification 'Science' Scientific

00:30:00
Is there a constitutional right to “physician-assisted suicide”? What about a “dignified death”—and what is a dignified death? Should terminally ill patients facing mental incapacitation or unbearable pain have access to fatal ingestion—also known as physician aid in dying? Or would that jeopardize our society’s progress toward more compassionate, comfort-based care?

01:09:05
In this intimate talk from 1990, cross-cultural composer and musician Jin Hi Kim reflects on her diverse experiences in Eastern and Western musical worlds.

00:31:50
In this intimate talk from 1990, cross-cultural composer and musician Jin Hi Kim reflects on her diverse experiences in Eastern and Western musical worlds.

01:00:00
Join us for another podcast in our series, Speaking of Music Rewind. This program features Grammy and Pulitzer-winning composer Steve Reich, a pioneer of minimalist, jazz, and Western Classical music.

Join us for another podcast in our series, Speaking of Music Rewind. This program features Grammy and Pulitzer-winning composer Steve Reich, a pioneer of minimalist, jazz, and Western Classical music.

00:53:03
Najma Akhtar is a singer, composer, and actress who has been in heavy rotation in the World Music orbit for over 20 years. She was born and raised in England but sings in the traditional style of India, her ancestral homeland. In this presentation from 1991, she performs many songs with her band, and openly discusses her unique cultural and musical fusions.

55:58:00
Najma Akhtar is a singer, composer, and actress who has been in heavy rotation in the World Music orbit for over 20 years. She was born and raised in England but sings in the traditional style of India, her ancestral homeland. In this presentation from 1991, she performs many songs with her band, and openly discusses her unique cultural and musical fusions.

01:07:18
Meredith Monk has been on the vanguard of interdisciplinary performance for 45 years. In this conversation from 1984, she discusses her works of that era, reflects on her process and aspirations for her work, takes questions, and performs excerpts from Education of the Girlchild.