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00:28:20
Dr. Jim Tour, a chemist at Rice University, builds the world’s smallest vehicles. He calls them “nanocars,” and he thinks these tiny vehicles might lead to nano-sized factories. We’ll also hear from University of Florida graduate student Diane Hickey, who will tell us some of the interesting reactions she’s run into when explaining nanotechnology.

00:22:52
Join us as we speak with IBM Fellow Dr. Don Eigler, who first used a scanning tunneling microscope to demonstrate the ability to build structures at the atomic level by spelling “I-B-M” with individual atoms. Also, meet Tom Rockwell, Director of Public Exhibition at the Exploratorium, who describes, in an audio essay, how he imagines the land of the very small.

00:26:48
This full-length podcast gives you the full flavor of our Summer Institute. Our staff will tell you about our special month-long Institute, which offers a rich mix of hands-on activities based on Exploratorium exhibits, in-depth content discussions, classroom materials and activities, and machine shop experience. In this podcast, teacher participants tell you what they think about the Summer Institute and how it affected them.

00:11:17
If you’re in a rush, this truncated version will give you information about our Summer Institute, but with less commentary from staff and participants than the full version.

00:10:00
Stephanie Chasteen speaks with Zan Stine, a graduate student in the Earth and Planetary Sciences Department at the University of California at Berkeley, at the annual American Geophysical Union meeting. Mr. Stine tells us about his search for the reasons why summer is coming earlier than it did in the past.

00:10:00
Stephanie Chasteen speaks with Jerry Osborne of the University of Calgary about his work studying glaciers to understand how the climate is changing in recent years.

00:07:53
Exploratorium Producer Mary Miller chats with Marika Holland, Climate Modeler for the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Holland co-authored a recent study projecting that the summer Arctic sea ice could completely disappear by 2040.

00:07:18
Join Mary Miller in conversation with Mark Serreze, Senior Research Scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, as they discuss recent dramatic decreases in Arctic sea ice and what that means for global climate stability.

Can pets predict earthquakes? Do quakes happen more often at certain times of the day or year? And could a really big one mean the end of California? Exploratorium geologist Eric Muller separates earthquake fact from fiction.

Relive the Loma Prieta quake with our photographer, Amy Snyder, who was caught in an outhouse at the beach. Why didn't it, or any San Francisco skyscapers, collapse?