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Staff educator Tory Brady performs a bit of theater, demonstrating the roles of the star players in the immune system.

Newton wasn’t really ready to believe that light was a wave, and so he didn’t see what was in front of his eyes. Staff physicist Paul Doherty tells how to do the same experiment that Newton did back in the 1650s to see the wave nature of light.

In this gem from 1990, we get a brief peek into the flourishing mind of German-born composer/sculptor Trimpin, a MacArthur "genius" award winner and the subject of a recent feature documentary. He chronicles his unique adventures through sound and music making, takes audience questions, and stages modified versions of his musical installations in front of the live audience.

Put kids’ skepticism to work! Children’s book author David Schwartz explains how a class disagreed with the numbers in one of his math books, and set out to prove him wrong!

Exploratorium staff educator Don Rathjen makes some noise with this activity about Newton’s laws.

Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey explains what temperature and color have to do with one another.

When this chemistry teacher entered her portable classroom as a new teacher, she was fresh from West Africa—and there was a lot she didn’t know.

Nobody can really teach you anything—rather, you have to learn it for yourself. So how can you help your students understand science? TI staff educator Modesto Tamez shares some thoughts about helping students make ideas their own.

On January 15th we will release a gem of a vintage interview with revolutionary musician/composer Astor Piazolla! In this inspired 1989 chat, Argentinean nuevo tango composer and bandoneon (concertina) player Astor Piazzolla dazzles the audience with a surprising story about the tango's origin in Argentina. He traces his musical beginnings and the "very beautiful way of feeling crazy" that resulted in his best compositions. Piazzolla also plays the bandoneon, and answers audience questions.

Geeks have strange hobbies. Staff physicist Paul Doherty plays the corrugated plastic tube, also known as a “whirly,” and explains the surprising science behind the sound.