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Experience Buckyball, a towering 25-foot illuminated sculpture that features two nested, geodesic spheres. Inspired by the shape explored by futurist and inventor Buckminster Fuller, Buckyball is the creation of New York���based artist Leo Villareal, celebrated in San Francisco for his monumental public sculpture The Bay Lights. On view at the Exploratorium from March 2016- February 2017 Comprised of 4,500 LED nodes arranged along a series of pentagons and hexagons, Buckyball is animated by custom software programmed by Villareal to display over 16 million distinct colors. The lights dynamically shift and fade in both sequenced patterns and random order, generating vibrant hues that will enliven the Exploratorium���s public space in both daylight and moonlight. With a background in both sculpture and media art, Villareal's light sculpture and site-specific architectural works have been inspired by the immersive light explorations of artists such as James Turrell, Robert Irwin, and Dan Flavin. His work also builds on the computation-based, moving image experiments of artists exploring pattern and "visual music," such as John and James Whitney. The spherical, soccer ball���like form of Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes, which informs Villareal's work, was discovered in a carbon molecule by scientists in 1985. It was coined the "Buckminsterfullerene" or "Buckyball" in homage to him, and has since been avidly researched by scientists and material engineers On view at the Exploratorium from March 2016- February 2017.

Artist Tim Hawkinson is celebrated for his idiosyncratic, imaginative artworks that re-purpose everyday materials in inventive sculptural constructions that simultaneously confound and delight. Hawkinson has collaborated with the Center for Art and Inquiry and the Studio for Public Spaces to create the third installment of our adventurous Over the Water series of large-scale artworks for the civic space at Pier 15. Bosun���s Bass is a tide-activated sound work inspired by the bosun's call, the high-pitched whistle used by mariners to give commands that can be heard over the roar of the sea. Evoking the eerie sounds of San Francisco���s maritime past, Hawkinson���s whimsical work employs elements of everyday transportation���shipping container, bus bellows, bicycle���to create a bass bosun's whistle, which is tuned three octaves lower than the traditional instrument. The shipping container, pitched vertically and installed over a hole in the deck of Pier 15, provides the lungs of the system. Tidal waters rise and fall in the container, compressing air and pushing it up into a giant bellows mounted above. The bellows, reclaimed from the pleated section of an articulated Muni bus, provides a steady source of pressurized air, which moves through a hose to the bicycle frame and there blows the bosun���s pipe. The airflow is controlled by a series of valves, levers, and other mechanisms that emulate a bosun���s hand and mouth motions to produce different sounds in the whistle. Cued by patterns cut into the tread of the bike's rear wheel, the bass bosun's pipe plays 21 different traditional calls including "Attention," "Carry On," "Swab the Deck," and "Pipe Down.���

Inspired by the works of Bob Miller (1935���2007), natural philosopher, light artist, and Exploratorium icon, Actual Reality invites us to wade into a sea of images and sounds and, through attention, catch slippery, individual moments of reality. During this multimedia performance, a video recreating one of Miller���s ���Light Walks������outdoor explorations of sunlight resolving into images through both naturally occurring pinholes and ingenious props���flows behind musicians improvising from a simple, expansive score. Through a combination of live performance and technological interventions���including a heliostat prototype Miller originally used for tracking the sun���lucky dragons playfully resolves these visual and aural streams into unique experiences of repeating elements. Actual Reality is presented in conjunction with "Light Walk: The Work of Bob Miller," an exhibition at the San Francisco Public Library on view through February 5, 2014. lucky dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles���based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active since 2000, lucky dragons is known for an open and participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools. luckydragons.org

Light Walk captures former Exploratorium artist and "natural philosopher" Bob Miller (1935-2007) leading a portion of his fabled walk, a blend of performance art and radical pedagogy that evolved into an Exploratorium institution. Developed over many years, Bob's walk was continually nourished by the observations, questions, and astonishment of visitors, teachers, and museum staff.

We Make the Treasure by Paul Ramirez Jonas June 19, 2014���January 2015 Location: Exploratorium Pier 15 Admission: Free The second installment in the Over the Water series of large-scale, commissioned artworks. Explore the value of objects lost and recovered, above and below the water line, at We Make the Treasure, the second installment in our Over the Water series of large-scale commissioned artworks. By traversing layers of present-day experience and forgotten history, we invite you to investigate the visible and invisible forces that make something a treasure. Ephemeral, pulsing lines of air bubbles break the surface of the water between Piers 15 and 17, suggesting the ghostly outline of the Beeswing, a schooner that sank on February 17, 1863, as it returned to San Francisco from Monterey. Near the bubbling wreck is a rowboat loaded with mysterious cargo. Visitors are invited to interact with the imagined treasure of the Beeswing by using a crane to find and exchange a haul comprised of coin-sized objects of indeterminate value. We Make the Treasure is curated by the Exploratorium���s Center for Art & Inquiry in collaboration with the Studio for Public Space. Nato Thompson, chief curator of Creative Time in New York, served as advising curator.

This short documentary chronicles the people, places, things, and ideas at the core of The Windows, a four-day trek from the back deck of the Exploratorium to the top of Mount Diablo. Led by artist Harrell Fletcher and the Exploratorium's Center for Art & Inquiry in the summer of 2013, the walk involved a dozen hikers and dozens more participants and learning experiences en route to the summit. http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/the-windows

Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya muses on her ephemeral outdoor creation for the Exploratorium���the Fog Bridge���explaining it as both an homage to San Francisco and a conversation with nature itself.

British artist and tinkerer Tim Hunkin takes a break from installing his latest creation for the Exploratorium ��� a massive, whimsical, kinetically sculptural clock featuring legions of tiny tinkerers at work ��� to discuss the clock���s inspiration and evolution over a proper English cup of tea.

The Exploratorium has commissioned San Francisco-based filmmaker Paul Clipson to create an abstract 16mm film study of the area surrounding our new downtown waterfront site at Pier 15. The film showcases Clipson's extraordinary treatment of the complex natural and cultural systems in the urban landscape, from the ephemeral rhythms of light and water to the rigid order of crosswalks and skyscrapers. Clipson���s work generally involves live collaborative performances with sound artists and musicians. For this film, an original soundtrack will be written and performed by composer Tashi Wada.

As a part of the Exploratorium's opening ceremonies, Miwa Matreyek performed in our Outdoor Gallery on April 17, 2013. In her live performance, Matreyek interacted with beautifully expressed cinematic narratives that unfolded as wondrous journeys, exploring nature and the human imagination.