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00:32:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. While successfully isolated by Hans Christian Ørsted in 1825 and Friedrich Wöhler in 1827, metallic aluminum remained hard to obtain until the end of the nineteenth century, when a new smelting process made it inexpensive to produce. Find out more about aluminum from Exploratorium scientist, Ron Hipschman.

00:25:00
Versatile aluminum, once worth nearly twice its weight in gold, has since become the quintessential metal of our modern lives. Find out more about aluminum from Mara Holt Skov, a design professor from California College of the the Arts.

00:1:39
The warm glow of the projected image invites us to in-between worlds. During this cinematic celebration, now an annual favorite, the passive act of watching turns to listening, peering, touching, and interacting as Exploratorium Cinema Arts takes over museum spaces to provide experiences—both on and off the screen—created by artists and filmmakers from the Bay Area and beyond.

03:00:00
For the solar eclipse of 2016, the Exploratorium was on the island of Woleai, in Micronesia, with multiple telescopes trained on the sun. These telescopes were connected to a laptop holding custom-made software that looks at the movement of the moon and the brightness of the sun. Composer Wayne Grim used this software to create a live composition based on the data. The musical composition uses rotational and orbital periods of the Earth, moon, and sun as formal elements.

00:12:06
For the solar eclipse of 2016, the Exploratorium was on the island of Woleai, in Micronesia, with multiple telescopes trained on the sun. These telescopes were connected to a laptop holding custom-made software that looks at the movement of the moon and the brightness of the sun. Composer Wayne Grim used this software to create a live composition based on the data. The musical composition uses rotational and orbital periods of the Earth, moon, and sun as formal elements. Here is an excerpt from the 3 hour piece.

00:05:06
See the highlights of totality from the total solar eclipse of March 8/9 2016! The Exploratorium and NASA went to Woleai, a tiny atoll in the Federated States of Micronesia, where we broadcast the eclipse live. Totality began at 11:38 a.m. on March 9 in Woleai, Micronesia, which was 5:38 p.m. on March 8 in San Francisco.

00:01:24
In this video, Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty explains why you rarely see a true scale model of the Earth, sun, and moon. Understanding the true scale of the solar system helps us appreciate the rarity of total solar eclipses: it’s unusual when objects at such distances line up perfectly.

00:01:54
In this video, Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty explains why we don't have a total solar eclipse every month. A total solar eclipse happens when the moon crosses between the sun and Earth and casts its shadow onto our planet. But the orbit of the moon is tilted relative to the orbit of the Earth around the sun, so the moon often passes below or above Earth. At those times, it does not cross the line between the sun and the Earth, and therefore does not create a solar eclipse. There are just two times a year in the Earth's orbit when there is a possibility of a total solar eclipse.

00:03:45
Join Exploratorium astronomer Isabel Hawkins, and Exploratorium educator Liliana Blanco as they explain the celestial mechanics of a total solar eclipse. Through demonstrations, they show how the moon, sun, and Earth align to create the cosmic coincidence that we see as a total solar eclipse.

00:02:25
The Exploratorium is sending a production crew thousands of miles by plane and by boat to Woleai, Micronesia, to broadcast a solar eclipse live to the world. Many factors went into choosing a destination for the broadcast. Executive Producer Robyn Higdon looked along the path of totality for this eclipse, which will start in Indonesia and sweep across the Pacific Ocean, to find a location with good weather predictions and solid land for setting up the telescopes. The Woleai Atoll in Micronesia was the perfect choice. Tune in on March 8th at 5:00 p.m. PST to watch the live broadcast!