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Jesse Marsh: Exhibits

Jesse Marsh
Exhibit Design Engineer

Jesse is a prototyper, designer, and builder with the SPS team. Jesse came to the Exploratorium in 2007 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (BS in Mechanical Engineering). Here he has designed, built, and maintained science exhibits for museums worldwide. He is facile with a suite of computer design, engineering, and documentation tools. As a builder, he brings skills in wood, metal, electrical, and water systems to creating technically complex products from prototypes to finished exhibits.

Jesse believes in sharing his knowledge with others as a teacher and collaborator. He has mentored students building robots and Rube Goldberg machines, and has taught young designer-builders. He collaborates with scientists, design partners, and Exploratorium staff in his work. Jesse cherishes the teaching and learning moments in the SPS prototyping process and he blogs regularly to share what he learns. Complementing his work at the Exploratorium, Jesse has found the bicycle to be another great machine for learning. He discovers new roads regularly with the San Francisco Randonneurs.

What’s going on?

The center dot at this exhibit is pure yellow light. It’s surrounded by a ring of 11 dots of varying colors, created by mixing different proportions of red and green light. (Surprise: Red and green light mixed together appear yellow to our eyes.)

Exactly which of the red/green dots seems to best match the yellow dot varies from person to person. Thanks to variations in the pigments of our retinas, people perceive color differently. One person will see a match between colors that another person thinks are very different.

Related Exhibits

What’s going on?

The center dot at this exhibit is pure yellow light. It’s surrounded by a ring of 11 dots of varying colors, created by mixing different proportions of red and green light. (Surprise: Red and green light mixed together appear yellow to our eyes.)

Exactly which of the red/green dots seems to best match the yellow dot varies from person to person. Thanks to variations in the pigments of our retinas, people perceive color differently. One person will see a match between colors that another person thinks are very different.

Related Exhibits