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ben finney portrait

 

Ben Finney is an anthropologist best known for his work in cultural and social anthropology. He has written extensively on the topics of surfing, the settlement of Oceania, and the practice of non-instrument navigation, canoe construction, and the colonization of space by humans. In 1973, Dr. Finney co-founded the Polynesian Voyaging Society with artist Herb Kawainui Kāne and Hawaiian waterman Tommy Holmes. Together they constructed Hōkūleʻa, a design-accurate replica of a deep-sea voyaging canoe. In 1976, Hōkūleʻa completed a historic voyage from Hawai'i to Tahiti navigated completely without Instruments. Dr. Finney has played a significant role in the reemergence of oceanic navigation and the practice of deep-sea voyaging. 

bruce blankenfeld portrait

 

Bruce Blankenfeld is a resident of Niu Valley, O'ahu, an active paddler and coach of the Hui Nalu Canoe Club, licensed captain, and a practicing master navigator who first began his involvement in voyaging with the Polynesian Voyaging Society in 1977. He has sailed extensively around the Pacific and along its rim with visits to ports in Tahiti, the Cook Islands, Aotearoa, Tonga, Samoa, Rangiroa, Marquesas, Mangareva, Rapa Nui, Micronesia, Japan, Canada, and Alaska. In 2007, Bruce and four other native Hawaiian navigators were bestowed the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, by master navigator Mau Piailug in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, allowing him entry into an elite society of oceanic navigators.  

catherine fuller portrait

 

Catherine Fuller is an Assistant Dean at 'Iolani Elementary School, an avid paddler for the Hui Nalu Canoe Club, a licensed captain, and a navigator from Honolulu, O'ahu. She has been a member of the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 1993 and an original crewmember of the 'Aha Pūnana Leo's deep-sea voyaging canoe, Hokualaka'i. Cat was a part of the 1995 voyage from Hawai'i to the Society Islands and Marquesas. She also sailed as apprentice navigator on the second leg of the 1999 voyage to Rapa Nui from the Marquesas to Mangareva.  

chad kalepa baybayan portrait

 

 Chad Kālepa Baybayan began sailing in 1975 when Hōkūleʻa moored close to his home as it conducted its first training cruise around the Hawaiian Islands. His first sailing experiences were aboard the Mo'olele of the voyaging group Gui o Wa'a Kaulua on the leeward coast of the island of Maui. Kālepa has been a participant on all the major voyages of Hōkūleʻa since 1980 and as a crewmember has sailed to Tahiti, the Cook Islands, Aotearoa, Tonga, Samoa, Rangiroa, Marquesas, Pitcairn, Mangareva, Rapa Nui, Micronesia, Japan, Canada, Washington, and California. In 2007, Kālepa and four other native Hawaiian navigators were bestowed the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, by master navigator Mau Piailug in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, allowing him entry into an elite society of oceanic navigators. Kalepa currently serves as the Navigator in Residence at the 'Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai'i and as the captain and navigator of the Hilo-porter deep-sea voyaging canoe, Hokualaka'i. 

chadd 'onohi paishon portrait

 

 Chadd 'Onohi Paishon has been an active deep-sea voyager since 1990 and has participated in voyages across the equator on both the Hōkūleʻa and Malali'i. Possessing a strong will to learn, Onohi has quickly ascended to the rank of navigator and captain. He currently serves as the Executive Director of Na Kalai Wa'a Moku o Keawe voyaging group where he has conducted voyaging education programs for the past 15 years. Noted for a strong voice that carries the melodies of the ocean well, he has entertained many a crewmember under the umbrella of a starry oceanic night. In 2007, Onohi and four other native Hawaiian navigators were bestowed the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, by master navigator Mau Piailug in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, allowing him entry into an elite society of oceanic navigators. 

Herb Kāne portrait

 

Herb Kāne is a world-renowned Hawaiian artist, historian, and author who was raised in Waipi'o Valley on the Big Island of Hawai'i. He is one of the co-founders of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, which revived the modern day voyaging movement through the construction of the deep-sea canoe Hōkūleʻa and the renewal of the practice of deep-sea non-instrument navigation. In 1984,  Herb Kāne was selected as a Living Treasure of Hawai'i. His artwork is a source of inspiration for Pacific Islanders, allowing them to visually revisit epic moments from their history. 

john stallman portrait

 

John Stallman was born and raised in the mountains of Idaho, where he developed a passion for the natural world early in life. He earned a bachelor of science in biology from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and though his formal education in biology was focused on comparative physiology and marine biology, John quickly switched fields after moving to Hawai'i in 2003. After working on the high seas as a marine observer for NOAA Fisheries, John turned his attention to botany and has spent the past several years studying the unique flora of the Hawaiian Islands. John has spent time working as an eco-tour guide, surveyed native forests for the State of Hawai'i, and conducted field research for the National Park Service. Currently, John works as an interpretive ranger at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park and on his own time, consults with landowners on the island of Hawai'i to encourage conservation of native forest elements on private properties. 

ka'iu kimura portrait

 

Ka'iu Kimura was born and raised in Waimea on the island of Hawai'i and has been a crewmember of the voyaging canoes Makali'i, Hokuala'ka'i, and Hōkūleʻa. An avid paddler and steerswoman for Keaukaha Canoe Club, she participated in the 2007 voyage to Satawal and Japan. In 2009 she received her masters degree in Hawaiian language and literature from the Ka Haka 'Ula o Ke'elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawai'i at Hilo. She currently serves as the Executive Director of the 'Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai'i, a science center celebrating the achievements of oceanic explorers and world-class astronomy conducted of the summit of Kauna Kea.  

ka'iulani murphy portrait

 

Ka'iulani Murphy is from Waimea, on the island of Hawai'i. In 1997, as a student at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, she became involved with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. She has been a part of the voyage to Rapa Nui in 1999-2000, the Voyage to the Kupuna Islands in 2004, and the 2007 voyage to Micronesia and Japan. She is currently an instructor at the Honolulu Community College and continues to assist the voyaging community with education initiatives. Ka'iu is emerging as a principal navigator in a cadre of young Hawaiians who are once again rediscovering the voyaging arts.  

Kailin Kim portrait

 

Kailin Ki is from Kamilo'iki, O'ahu, and is currently a student at the University of Hawai'i at Hilo. She has been a part of the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 2005. In 2009, she had the opportunity to sail as a crewmember on board Hōkūleʻa on a voyage from Palmyra Atoll to Hawai'i. With a strong interest in the voyaging arts, Kailin is currently studying to become a navigator.  

Kaimana Barcarse portrait

 

Kaimana Barcarse hails from Waiākea on the island of Hawai'i. His involvement in voyaging began in 1999 as a crewmember of the voyaging canoe Hokualaka'i. He presently serves as the Director of Honuakai, the Exploration Sciences Division of the 'Aha Punana Leo. He is also an instructor of Voyaging & Navigation and Ethno-zoology at Ka Haka Ula o Ke'alikolani Hawaiian Language College of the University of Hawai'i at Hilo. He participated in the 2005 voyage to Mokumanamana and Nihoa, the 2007 voyage to Satawal and Japan, and various sails aboard Hōkūleʻa and Hokuala'ka'i. He enjoys sharing his passion for voyaging through the artistic venue of digital media.  

Kalena Silva portrait

 

Kalena Silva is the Director of Ka Haka Ula O Ke'elikolani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawai'i at Hilo and a Professor ofHawaiian Studies in College. In addition to his responsibilities as Director, Dr. Silva teaches courses in Hawaiian language, literature, culture, and performing arts in the College's undergraduate and graduate programs. Since the inception of modern Hawaiian medium education-first in the nonprofit 'Aha Pūnana Leo Preschool Program and later in the Hawai'i Department of Education's Kula Kaiapuni Hawai'i Hawaiian Immersion Program- Dr. Silva has developed P-12 Hawaiian language educational materials for use in the schools. Curriculum materials include original stories, songs, and Hawaiian translations of science and social studies texts. As a part of Hawaiian immersion teacher training at UH-Hilo, he has also offered courses in traditional literature, oratory, poetry, chanting, and dance.

Silva has performed, taught, and lectured on Hawaiian music, dance, and language in Hawai'i and abroad. He has also served as a judge at several major Hawaiian performing arts competitions and participated in the making of video documentaries on the influential lives of noteworthy Hawaiians. 

 

Milton(Shorty) Bertelmann portrait

 

Milton(Shorty) Bertelmann was a crewmember aboard Hōkūleʻa's 1976 inaugural voyage to Tahiti. While training for that voyage, Shorty began working with navigator Mau Piailug, becoming his first Hawaiian student and establishing a lifelong friendship between teacher and student. His sailing resume shows visits to Tahiti, Aotearoa, Samoa, Rangiroa, Marquesas, and Micronesia. Noted for his quiet demeanor, Shorty is a respected leader in the voyaging community and one of its most experienced captains. In 2007, Shorty and four other native Hawaiian navigators were bestowed the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, by master navigator Mau Piailug in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, allowing him entry into an elite society of oceanic navigators.  

Nainoa Thompson portrait

 

Nainoa Thompson is a Hawaiian navigator and the Executive Director of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Nainoa received part of his training from master navigator Mau Piailug of the island of Satawal. Mau Piailug was the navigator on board Hōkūleʻa's first voyage to Tahiti in 1976. Nainoa's first solo navigation was from Hawai'i to Tahiti in 1980. Since then, Thompson has been the lead navigator on some of the many subsequent voyages of Hōkūleʻa. On March 18, 2007, Thompson and four other native Hawaiian navigators were bestowed the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, by master navigator Mau Piailug in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, allowing him entry into an elite society of oceanic navigators. Nainoa Thompson currently serves on the Board of Trustees for the Kamehameha Schools.  

Nelson Lamona Shintani portrait

 

Nelson Lamona Shintani is a fluent Hawaiian speaker as are all residents of his home island of Ni'ihau. Growing up on Ni'ihau where ranching and fishing are the primary daily activities for its small community provided Mona with a unique set of skills, such as weaving nets and working with leather. Today, Mona applies those skills by being the principal rigger aboard the Hilo-ported Hokualaka'i. Mona participated in the 1999 voyage of Hōkūleʻa to Mangareva and its 2007 voyage to Japan. As a native speaker, he serves as a mentor to the Hawaiian language student crewmembers aboard Hokualaka'i.  

Pa'anaakala (Kala) Baybayan

 

Pa'anaakala (Kala) Baybayan  is a student at the University of Hawai'i at Hilo where she is studying Hawaiian language and majoring in political science. With a strong interest in the voyaging traditions of her ancestors, she currently sails as a crewmember aboard the Hokualaka'i and studies as an apprentice navigator alongside her father, Kalepa Baybayan. She participated in the 2007 voyage of Hōkūleʻa to Japan.  

Paul Coleman

 

Paul Coleman is a Native Hawaiian astrophysicist at the Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i. He obtained his undergraduate degree at Note Dame University and Ph.D. in astrophysics at the University of Pittsburgh in 1985. After postdoctoral work in the Netherlands and in Puerto Rico, Paul returned to Hawai'i and has focused his radio astronomy research on the large-scale structure of the universe, quasars, the interstellar medium, and galaxies. Professor Coleman mentors undergraduate students as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program funded by the NSF. He has served as a bridge between the Native Hawaiian community and the astronomical community at Mauna Kea, advocating for environmental protection and providing a voice for Hawaiian tradition atop the mountain. He resides with his family in Honolulu, O'ahu.  

Pius (Mau) Piailug

 

Pius (Mau) Piailug is a master navigator from the Micronesian Island of Satawal, and a central figure in the renaissance of traditional navigation in Hawai'i. Mau guided Hōkūleʻa from Hawai'i to Tahiti on its maiden voyage in 1976, and served as teacher and mentor to Native Hawaiian navigator Nainoa Thompson. Born on Satawal in 1932, Mau was trained in navigation from an early age by his grandfather. He achieved the rank of Pwo, or master navigator, at the age of 18. In 2007, Mau bestowed the rank of Pwo on five Native Hawaiian navigators in a traditional ceremony held on the island of Satawal, where he still lives today.  

Pomai Bertelmann

 

Pomai Bertelmann is the daughter of the late Clayton Bertelmann, founder of the Na Kalai Wa'a Moku o Keawe, builder of its deep sea voyaging canoe, Makali'i, and its first captain. Drawing on her family's experience as ranchers and sailors, Pomai demonstrates a natural ability at negotiating the rigorous environment of an open-decked canoe. She has participated in multiple voyages across the equator on both Makali'i and Hōkūleʻa. In 2007 she sailed to Micronesia and the island of Satawal as a crewmember aboard the voyaging canoe Alinganomaisu, a 57-foot deep-sea voyaging canoe that was the culmination of a project started by her father to give master navigator Mau Piailug a large voyaging canoe of his own to serve as an educational platform for the youth of his islands. Today, Pomai continues in her father's footsteps as an educator providing programs to the communities on the leeward side of the island of Hawai'i.  

Wiliama Ka'ohelauli'i

 

Wiliama Ka'ohelauli'i grew up on the island of Ni'ihau and is a fluent speaker of the Hawaiian language. New to voyaging, Wiliama's principal function as a crewmember is to be a language mentor for crewmembers aboard Hokualaka'i, the deep-sea voyaging canoe of the Hawaiian language revitalization organization, 'Aha Punana Leo.  

William K. (Billy) Richards, Jr.

 

William K. (Billy) Richards, Jr. was raised and still resides in Kailua on the windward side of O'ahu. He currently serves as the President of the Friends of Hōkūleʻa and Hawai'iloa, and is a senior co-chair of the voyaging collaborative 'Ohana Wa'a. Billy first stepped aboard Hōkūleʻa in May of 1975 and took part in Hōkūleʻa's 1976 maiden voyage to Tahiti. A senior crewmember, his resume includes participation in the Voyage of Rediscovery(1985 - 1987), No Na Mamo (1992), and Na Ohana Holo Moana (1995) aboard the voyaging canoe Makali'i for its maiden voyage to Tahiti. In 2007 he participated in Ku Holo Mau, a defining voyage that took Hōkūleʻa and its crew to Mau Piailug's home island of Satawal. When not at sea, Billy serves as Director of Communications for Partners in Development Foundation, a public nonprofit organization that serves the Native Hawaiian community through educational and social services programs.